Chit chat: (new section). This secton can be recent tweets, and or just some off the cuff comments.

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Started working with some Arduino circuits. Digital, analog and pwm. Built the tv out interface, but it does not work with ethernet ugh. Had a real nice project planned. in any case I was able to do web page scraping. Installed the ide for Arduino on the laptop.

Changed the root password on the Beagleboard.

Already had motion working on the RPi. The RPI basically only uses digital. Might experiment with r2r before getting some adc and dac chips.

Playing with some of my OTA HDTV antennas. Had to resecure one of them. Connection was loose. Getting over 100 stations now. Made a sort of square spiral antenna, but have not tested it yet.

Cooking hacks: Was able to make cheese in a coffee maker. Found another recipe for making beer that was also for a coffee maker, but I do not really drink. W.C Fields allegedly said “I don’t drink, I guzzle!”

 Using the Arduino for proects. simplest lately was to project a simple web page so that I could take down the internal web server without the users not knowing what was going on. Sort of an under construction page is delivered. Next project is to interface an old composite monitor and use it for displaying messages that can be updated via ethernet remotely.
Installed adosbox on the Nexus 7. Running a lot of my old qbasic programs such as a spreadsheet on it. Not gui, but sure is practical especially in the fact I do not have to deal with android development packages.The new Black Beaglebone came yesterday. (Father’s day present?) Disappointed it did not have composite video out, Oh well, it’s other features are outstanding. There is supposed to be a cape that supports vga and sound out, but it is not available readily yet.Nice to see Richard Branson wearing a t-shirt that touts linux.

Need to set up my laptop for doing Arduino development, but then doing it on the RPi would be even better especially as a wearable computer.

The newer version of the Rpi just came in the mail today (another father’s day present also?). Play with it later. There was an article on instructables.com to install a minecraft server on the RPi. but may take that article and install the server on an old pc instead. More important things for the RPi to do. They had a web cam at Fry’s for five bucks. Be interesting to see if it works with motion on the RPi.

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Handhelds are really nice, but you get away from the traditional desktop we are all familiar with.  Some people have coined the icon based tablet interfaces as being made by Fisher-Price (a toy manufacturer).  Also too, people are wanting to lower the system requirements for computers being used primarily as terminals. One way to do that is to only have the basic operating system on the machine with just the browser as a single application. How useful is that?  You can use a server to dole out applications as I  indicated in the last article.

You now have operating systems that work from the web. You can push out desktop operating systems  based on the traditional commercial software, but that gets into to some real heavy use. That requires a lot of heavy lifting (i.e. system resources). Now people are trending towards native web based operating systems that can be doled out with just a web server. Traditional virtual machine servers become less a necessity.

Went to Sourceforge.net to look at candidates. By the way, you are expected to log now to access their site. Fortunately I already had a login.  After logging in, randomly chose three web based desktops that can be run from the web to be featured. Eyeos, I have talked about before. but it does not hurt to mention it again, The two others are eXastum and w3OS. Wanted to see how it displayed both on a desktop and on a handheld.

EyeOS is discussed in more detail at: http://www.instructables.com/id/eyeOS/. Server install instructions included.  I have been using the free version for a while and I really like the fact I can prepare spreadsheets, office type documents, and even presentations. Pretty snazzy for something that does not have to be installed on your personal computer. Like all the following software can easily be used from a tablet. EyeOS seemed to scale well to the table and to the desktop.

EXastum is pretty much still beta and not for a production platform.Found it hard to use on the tablet, but then I did not examine all the possible settings. One advantage of eXastum is that it does not use Adobe Flash or Java. It is mostly HTML5. All you have to do to use the software is just point to where is is located and boom your up and running. Perfect for an alternative for a whole OS such as Ubuntu. Nothing to root or take up too much space. eXastum dis work well on the desktop. To install it on a server all you have to do is copy the files to it’s own web directory and set the appropriate permissions. Will want to see what additions are made to eXastum. Certainly there will be challengers that will also use HTML5.

W3OS looks real interesting. That have a standalone version primarily for Microsoft based machines and then they seem to have a standalone version. Did not have time yet to install it to give a review. In fact the picture is from their own archive and not my system. Update: looked at the terribly written instructions and may try to install it yet.

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Beginning Android application,

Traditionally if you wanted to build an application for Android, you had to install a set of programs on the desktop computer. Doing so could cause a majority of problems. Now there are Android application environments now for direct use on Android such as the Nexus 7.  Such an application is called AIDE (Android integraded development environment).

You can get Aide directly from Google play and download it directly ot your device. Now lets build a simple hello world program. Everyone’s first program is usually the “Hello world” thing.  This will be a different experience from the days of:

$ gcc progname.c -o progname

or

$ ./config
$ make
$ sudo make install

1. Get AIDE. It can be downloaded from the Play™ store.

2. Open up AIDE and it will ask to create a new project.
AppName: HelloWorld
PackageName: com.meetdageeks.HelloWorld

3. Goto MainActivity.Java and add the three lines (without the comments!).

package com.HelloWorld;
import android.app.*;
import android.os.*;
import android.view.*;
import android.widget.*;
public class MainActivity extends Activity
{
    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
 {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
   //setContentView(R.layout.main);
                //<<<<<<<<  Add these three lines <<<<<
                TextView text = new TextView(this);            
  text.setText("Hello World, Android");          
  setContentView(text); 
                //<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 
        }
}

4. Click the 3 dots in the top right and hit run.  It may ask you to allow installation from unknown sources.  Done!

And you can check it from the installed apps lists.
Written from the same Android that created the project.

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Beginner Arduino circuits and code.

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Some Arduino test circuits

Blink an led. (in progress)

Screenshot from 2013-07-15 06:48:45.png
This will blink and led using a separed led and resistor besides the built in one.Code:
/*
Blink
Turns on an LED on for one second, then off for one second, repeatedly.This example code is in the public domain.
*/// Pin 13 has an LED connected on most Arduino boards.
// give it a name:
int led = 7;// the setup routine runs once when you press reset:
void setup() {
// initialize the digital pin as an output.
pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
}// the loop routine runs over and over again forever:
void loop() {
digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
delay(1000);               // wait for a second
digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
delay(1000);               // wait for a second
}
A button and an led. In (progress)
Screenshot from 2013-07-15 07:17:07.png
Used a button to turn on an led. (R2 is required to keep the arduino safe).Code:/*
Use a button to turn on a light.
This example code is in the public domain.
*/// Pin 13 has an LED connected on most Arduino boards.
// give it a name:
int led = 7;
int button = 6;// the setup routine runs once when you press reset:
void setup() {
// initialize the digital pin as an output.
pinMode(button, INPUT);
pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
}// the loop routine runs over and over again forever:
void loop() {
if (digitalRead(6) == 0) {
digitalWrite(7,1);
}
else {
digitalWrite(7,0);
}}
Pulse width modulation (PWM)
Screenshot from 2013-07-15 07:47:51.png
Varying the brightness of an led. (pulse width modulation./*
Pulse width modulation test
A
This example code is in the public domain.
*/// Pin 13 has an LED connected on most Arduino boards.
// give it a name:
int led = 5;
int button = 6;// the setup routine runs once when you press reset:
void setup() {
// initialize the digital pin as an output.
pinMode(button, INPUT);
pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
}// the loop routine runs over and over again forever:
void loop() {
if (digitalRead(button) == 0) {analogWrite(led, 255);
}
else {
analogWrite(led, 64);
}}

Step 12: Analog inPut (in progress)

Screenshot from 2013-07-15 07:34:09.png
To measure the resistance of a variable resistor. Read the results on the pc monitor.Code:

/*
ReadAnalogVoltage
Reads an analog input on pin 0, converts it to voltage, and prints the result to the serial monitor.
Attach the center pin of a potentiometer to pin A0, and the outside pins to +5V and ground.This example code is in the public domain.
*/// the setup routine runs once when you press reset:
void setup() {
// initialize serial communication at 9600 bits per second:
Serial.begin(9600);
}// the loop routine runs over and over again forever:
void loop() {
// read the input on analog pin 0:
int sensorValue = analogRead(A0);
// Convert the analog reading (which goes from 0 – 1023) to a voltage (0 – 5V):
float voltage = sensorValue * (5.0 / 1023.0);
// print out the value you read:
Serial.println(voltage);
}

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Normal pasta dinner except the cheese was made in the coffee maker,

SUNP0096

Good day.

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